Child protection practitioners can work with infants, children, adolescents, indigenous children and families and focus on their safety and wellbeing.

What does the work involve?

Under the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005, child protection practitioners have a specific statutory role which includes:

  • Providing advice and consultation to people who report concerns about children and young people
  • Assessing children and families where it is believed a child is at risk of significant harm
  • Making applications to, and attending, the Melbourne Children’s Court
  • Engaging and working with children and families to promote safety, stability and development of the child, and to strengthen family capacity.

Want to know more?

Information about practitioner qualifications or making an application for a child protection practitioner or advanced child protection practitioner role, visit Child Protection Jobs website.  

For enquiries about child protection practitioner (CPP3) positions please call the McArthur recruitment team on 03 9828 6565.

Read more about the Child Protection Workforce Strategy 2017-2020 on the Child Protection Jobs website.

 

Qualifications for working in child protection

Qualifications for working in child protection

The mandatory qualifications for working in child protection are:

A recognised Social Work degree or a similar welfare or behavioural related degree which includes:

(a) a primary focus on child development, human behaviour, family dynamics and/or impacts of trauma and preferably

(b) a practical component such as counselling or case work practice.

or

A recognised Diploma of Community Services work or similar qualification, which is studied over a minimum of two academic years of full-time study (or part-time equivalent) and includes:

(c) a primary focus on child development, human behaviour, family dynamics and/or impacts of trauma

(d) supervised fieldwork placements (ideally completed within the child and family welfare sector) and at least one unit in case management, case work practice or counselling.

and

A valid driver's licence.

Guidelines on child protection qualifications

Guidelines on child protection qualifications

The role of the child protection practitioner requires specialist child welfare knowledge as well as the ability to exercise legal delegations. As such it is paramount that staff are well prepared and able to practice in this dynamic and challenging environment.

There are clearly defined categories outlining criteria and mandatory qualifications and these are broken into three groups:

  • Preferred
  • Relevant qualifications
  • Minimum education requirements

For qualification advice on all child protection practitioner roles, please email the child protection recruitment team - childprotectionjobs@dhhs.vic.gov.au

Category A - Preferred

The curriculum content of these degrees is most compatible with the graduate attributes sought for entry into child protection practitioner positions. These courses include specific child wellbeing and protection core curriculum. They encompass the basic attitudes and values, knowledge and practice skills needed to promote the wellbeing of children, young people, and families and to prevent or respond to child abuse and neglect. Supervised practical placements form a core component of the program. The Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) accredits these degrees.

Category B - Relevant qualifications

These courses are at minimum bachelor level degrees with child protection associated core content including child development (comprising physical, cognitive, social and emotional development), human behaviour (that is, how behaviour is shaped by biology, learning experiences, cognitive, social and emotional development), family dynamics and/or impacts of trauma. These courses may contain units of study in counselling, casework practice and/or a supervised practical placement.

Category C - Minimum education requirements

The following qualifications are the minimum requirements for entry into a child protection practitioner role. These include diploma level qualifications and are studied over a minimum of two academic years of full time study (or part time equivalent). They include child protection associated core curriculum such as child development, human behaviour, family dynamics and/or impacts of trauma. These courses also include a minimum of 400 hours of supervised field work placement ideally completed within the child and family welfare sector, and at least one unit of study in case management, case work practice or counselling. The Australian Community Workers Association (ACWA) approves these courses.